Tag Archives: Pod filter for KOI

Cultivation of Algae

Cultivation of microalgae can be done in open systems (lakes, ponds) and in controlled closed systems called photo-bioreactors (PBR).

Open cultivation systems use ponds or lakes with added mechanical equipment to grow microalgae. Open ponds were the first cultivation technology for mass cultivation of microalgae. In this system water levels are kept no less than 15 cm, and algae are cultured under conditions identical to their natural environment. The pond is designed in a raceway configuration, in which a paddlewheel circulates and mixes the algal cells and nutrients.

Open cultivation system for growing algae

The raceways are typically made from poured concrete or they are simply dug into the earth and lined with a plastic liner to prevent the ground from soaking up the liquid. Baffles in the channel guide the flow around the bends in order to minimize space. The system is often operated in a continuous mode, where the fresh feed (containing nutrients including nitrogen phosphorus and inorganic salts) is added in front of the paddlewheel, and algal broth is harvested behind the paddlewheel after it has circulated through the loop. Depending on the nutrients required by algal species, several sources of wastewater can be used for algal culture. For some marine-type microalgae, seawater or water with high salinity can be used.

Raceway ponds growing algae

Although open ponds cost less to build and operate than closed systems using PBRs, this culture system has its disadvantages. The ponds can be built on any type of land but need large land areas for considerable biomass yield. Because they are in the open air, the water levels are affected from evaporation and rainfall. Natural CO2 levels in the atmosphere (0.03%-0.06%) are not enough for continuous mass growth of microalgae. Biomass productivity is also limited by contamination with unwanted algal species, organisms that feed on algae or other poisonous particles. Only few species can be grown in normal conditions.
Other types of construction use: 1) circular ponds where circulation is provided by rotating arms; 2) inclined systems where mixing is achieved through pumping and gravity flow.

Closed cultivation systems use PBRs – containers made of transparent materials for optimised light exposure. Enclosed PBRs have been employed to overcome the contamination and evaporation problems encountered in open systems. These systems are generally placed outdoors for illumination by natural light. The cultivation vessels have a large surface area-to-volume ratio. The most widely used PBR is a tubular design, which has a number of clear transparent tubes, usually aligned with the sun’s rays. The tubes are generally less than 10 centimeters in diameter to maximize sunlight penetration. The medium broth is circulated through a pump to the tubes, where it is exposed to light for photosynthesis, and then back to a reservoir. A portion of the algae is usually harvested after it passes through the solar collection tubes, making continuous algal culture possible.

In some PBRs, the tubes are coiled spirals to form what is known as a helical-tubular PBR. These systems sometimes require artificial light for energy, which adds to production costs.  Either a mechanical pump or an airlift pump maintain a highly turbulent flow within the reactor, which prevents the algal biomass from settling. The photosynthesis process generates oxygen. In an open raceway system, this is not a problem as the oxygen is simply returned to the atmosphere. In closed PBRS, the oxygen levels will build up until they inhibit and poison the algae. The culture must periodically be returned to a degassing zone—an area where the algal broth is bubbled with air to remove the excess oxygen. Also, the algae use CO2, which can cause carbon starvation and an increase in pH. Therefore, CO2 must be fed into the system in order to successfully cultivate the microalgae on a large scale.
PBRs require cooling during daylight hours, and the temperature must be regulated at night as well. This may be done through heat exchangers located either in the tubes themselves or in the degassing column.
The advantages of enclosed PBRs are obvious. They can overcome the problems of contamination and evaporation encountered in open systems. The biomass productivity of PBRs can average 16 times more than that of a traditional raceway pond. Harvest of biomass from PBRs is less expensive than from raceway ponds, because the typical algal biomass is about 30 times as concentrated as the biomass found in raceways. Controlled conditions in closed systems are suitable for genetic modification of algae cells and enable cultivation of better quality species (e.g. microalgae with higher oil content).
However, closed systems also have disadvantages. Technological challenges with PBRs are: overheating, bio-fouling, oxygen accumulation, difficulty in scaling up, cell damage by shear stress & deterioration and expensive building & maintenance. Light limitation cannot be entirely overcome because light penetration is inversely proportional to the cell concentration. Attachment of cells to the tubes’ walls may also prevent light penetration. Although enclosed systems can enhance biomass concentration, the growth of microalgae is still suboptimal due to variations in temperature and light intensity.
R&D in algae biotechnologies focus on developing innovative PBR designs and materials. Different developed designs are: serpentine, manifold, helical and flat containers. From these elevated reactors can be oriented and tilted at different angles and can use diffuse and reflected (artificial) light for growth. More specific information is available in PBRs section.
After growing in open ponds or PBRs, the microalgae biomass needs to be harvested for further processing. The commonly used harvest method is through gravity settlement or centrifuge. The oil from the biomass is extracted through solvent and further processed into biodiesel.

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ALGAE, AQUACULTURE, AQUAPONICS, CCRES AQUAPONICS, KOI, Slatkovodne Ribe, SPIRULINA, UZGOJ RIBA

Fuels From Algae

In the spectrum of alternative fuel sources, biofuel made from algae
is perhaps the most easily mocked.
 How could the slimy green muck that
grows in your aquarium and washes up on the beach be a future
cornerstone of American energy independence? So when President Obama
stood before the University of Miami recently and said algae could
provide up to 17 percent of our transportation fuel, we wanted to know:
Is he right? Here’s what we found out:
In February, President Obama announced the Department of Energy would
allocate $14 million in new funding to develop transportation fuels
from algae. DOE is already supporting over 30 such projects, together
worth $94 million.
CCRES SPIRULINA
project of
Croatian Center of Renewable Energy Sources (CCRES)
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ALGAE, AQUACULTURE, AQUAPONICS, CCRES AQUAPONICS, KOI, Slatkovodne Ribe, SPIRULINA, UZGOJ RIBA

Algae Production Workshop

 

  NAA

Announces

Algae Production Workshop

 in NJ

The National Algae Association (NAA) has announced that they will be presenting a Commercial Algae Production Technologies and Networking Workshop, May 1, 2012, at the Crowne Plaza Fairfield Hotel in Fairfield, New Jersey. The event will include a tour of Glenn Mills to view a commercial-scale algae extraction facility.

The focus of the Workshop will be on progress in commercial growing, harvesting and extraction methods, as well as proven technologies that are ready for commercial-scale algae production. NAA is inviting industry professionals to submit proposed presentations no later than April 10, 2012 for consideration. Membership in NAA is not required to present at or attend this event.

For additional information, please contact:

National Algae Association

936.321.1125
info@nationalalgaeassociation.com

 

CCRES SPIRULINA

project of

Croatian Center of Renewable Energy Sources (CCRES)

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AQUACULTURE, AQUAPONICS, CCRES AQUAPONICS, KOI, Slatkovodne Ribe, SPIRULINA, UZGOJ RIBA

CCRES AQUAPONICS CROATIA

CCRES AQUAPONICS CROATIA

  
HRVATSKI CENTAR OBNOVLJIVIH IZVORA ENERGIJE
predstavlja Vam
 Projekt
CCRES AQUAPONICS
Više informacija o Projektu CCRES AQUAPONICS na :
Za sve dodatne informacije slobodno nas kontaktirajte.
All the food CCRES produced during the year we give to poor families.
HRVATSKI CENTAR OBNOVLJIVIH IZVORA ENERGIJE (HCOIE)
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AQUACULTURE, AQUAPONICS, CCRES AQUAPONICS, KOI, Slatkovodne Ribe, SPIRULINA, UZGOJ RIBA

CCRES ALGAE

CCRES ALGAE

 We are committed to overcoming the world’s impending economic and environmental constraints with technology that produces sustainable, affordable, and local bio-based products from algae.

Algae hold great promise in the near term to fundamentally change America’s energy portfolio, sequester or convert atmospheric CO2 into market-ready products, and help grow our economy through the creation of tens of thousands of well-paying green-collar jobs. Algae-based jobs include:

Based on a survey conducted by the Algal Biomass Organization in January of 2010 with 52 reporting companies, a likely estimation of job growth is shown in the chart below as Scenario 1. In addition, based on the same survey, with the addition of regulatory and legislative parity in the US, accelerated job growth could occur as estimated Scenario 2.

Algae-based products and processes:

  • Can replace a significant percentage of America’s petroleum-based liquid transportation fuel, including jet fuel, gasoline and diesel, using photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic processes;
  • Are domestically produced and renewable;
  • Consume enormous amounts of CO2, and biologically sequester or beneficially reuse/convert atmospheric and industrial CO2into marketable products;
  • Can be grown in non-potable water, on non-agricultural land (thereby avoiding indirect land use issues).
  • Will be commercially produced in the near-term; low-carbon, drop-in transportation fuels will be produced by CCRES members within two years.
  • Can provide value-added co-products, including nutraceuticals, animal feed, cosmetics, plastics and other bio-based products, while also creating renewable, sustainable fuels.

World Ticker

World Population Estimate
7,003,790,794
03/30/2012 12:40 UTC

25% of fish are overexploited.
50% fully exploited.
37,701,652,877,614,190
Cubic feet since 1750 AD

2007? 2025? Never?
Many experts say it’s here.
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AQUACULTURE, AQUAPONICS, CCRES AQUAPONICS, KOI, SPIRULINA, UZGOJ RIBA

10 Tips Nutrition Education Series

Ten Tips Education Series

The Ten Tips Nutrition Education Series provides consumers and professionals with high quality, easy-to-follow tips in a convenient, printable format. These are perfect for posting on a refrigerator.

These tips and ideas are a starting point. You will find a wealth of suggestions here that can help you get started toward a healthy diet. Choose a change that you can make today, and move toward a healthier you. These tips are also available in Spanish.

More tips coming soon!

 

Croatian Center of Renewable Energy Sources  (CCRES)

special thanks to  

The Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, an organization of the U.S. Department of Agriculture

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AQUACULTURE, AQUAPONICS, CCRES AQUAPONICS, KOI, Slatkovodne Ribe, SPIRULINA, UZGOJ RIBA

CO2 Generator

 

This is how to make a homemade carbon dioxide generator for your aquarium plants or algae.

yeast

sugar

tubule

 bottle 2 lit

add sugar 50 g

 add yeast 20 g

pierce stopper

half a liter of hot water

distilled water with the pores of Spirulina

the pipe going into the water

 CO2 begin to sink into the water after 10 minutes

after a few weeks you have

 SPIRULINA

CCRES SPIRULINA 

project of

Croatian Center of Renewable Energy Sources (CCRES)

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AQUACULTURE, AQUAPONICS, CCRES AQUAPONICS, KOI, Slatkovodne Ribe, SPIRULINA, UZGOJ RIBA

Build an Aquaponics Grow Bed

  • Measure the length and width of the aquarium with the measuring tape.
  • Cut the plywood with the saw to the dimensions of the aquarium you measured in Step 1.
  • Cut four beams the same length and width of the plywood you cut in Step 2.

  • Drill holes into two beams and screw them together at a 90-degree angle. Lay the other two beams across the aquaponics grow bed.

  • Cut legs for the aquaponics grow bed frame. Place the frame where you will use it and measure and cut the legs to the length you need, keeping in mind the need to make them longer if there is a slope.

  • Drill holes into the legs. Keep them flush with the edge of the frame and screw them into place securely. Place the frame onto the plywood you cut in Step 2.

  • Place the grow bed right next to the aquarium or pond. Line the grow bed with pond foil the same length and width of the grow bed. Pour gravel on top of the pond foil in the grow bed. Cut a hole through the center of the grow bed and pond foil with the saw.

  • Place the water pump in the fish tank or pond and connect the water-in pipe to the pump.

  • Pull the water-in pipe through the hole in the grow bed. Install the overflow drain into the grow bed and set it to a few inches above the height of the grow bed to prevent water from overflowing.
  • Fill the aquarium or pond with water and place plants into the gravel of the grow bed.
CCRES AQUAPONICS special thanks to Zeljko Serdar for presentation of “How-To” module.
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AQUACULTURE, AQUAPONICS, CCRES AQUAPONICS, KOI, Slatkovodne Ribe, SPIRULINA, UZGOJ RIBA

Algae Competition: The Future of Algae

A Global Challenge to Design Visionary Algae Food and Energy Systems

Landscape Designs • Production Systems • Food Development

“How will growing algae change the world and improve our lives?”

Participants represent projects in 40 countries and have submitted amazing entries. Visit the exhibits.

The Future of Algae video introduces twenty visionary entries in the Competition. Beginning with algae pond systems and photobioreactors today, this video looks into our future, exploring emerging themes, schemes and dreams in algae architecture and landscape design.

More info at:  http://www.algaecompetition.com/

Croatian Center of Renewable Energy Sources special thanks to  Robert Henrikson and Mark Edwards
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AQUACULTURE, AQUAPONICS, CCRES AQUAPONICS, KOI, Slatkovodne Ribe, SPIRULINA, UZGOJ RIBA

CCRES promotes Elken Spirulina

Best Food for The Future – Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)
Spirulina contains nutrition not found in other food sources and is able to fulfill nutrition deficiency as well as neutralize our body’s acidic condition. Spirulina has been consumed by the Japanese for decades and has been proven to increase health and promote longevity.

To maintain healthy body, we need nutritious food which consists of 80% alkaline food, and 20% acidic food. Alkaline food presents only in vegetables, fruits, cheese, egg white and algae. Others are all acidic in nature. To make matter worse, modern food tends to be high in carbohydrates, calorie, glucose, fat and cholesterol, and at the same time, low in vitamin, minerals and proteins which are what our cells need the most. These conditions create nutrition-deficiency and acidic body condition.

Our body cells require 46 different types of nutrition in well balanced amount. These vitamins and minerals cannot be produced by our body and is used up daily. Therefore, we need to have them in our diets. Since the various types of nutrition may have dependencies among themselves, a lack in one element might cause another to be wasted.
Unbalanced nutrition may cause semi-healthy states, such as fatigue, susceptible to illness, lack of concentration, allergic, gastric and others.

Nutrisi tidak seimbang dan kondisi tubuh yang asam dapat mengakibatkan keadaan tubuh setengah sehat

Spirulina contains complete and balanced set of nutrition that is easily available to our cells for faster absorption and to strengthen our body’s immune system.

How to preserve health? Our body needs food in the following proportion to remain healthy: 80% alkaline food and 20% acidic food. Modern lifestyles and diets consist of mostly acidic food such as meat, seafood, grains and others. The choice of alkaline food is very limited and consist only of vegetables, fruits, algae, cheese and egg white. Spirulina is the best out of alkaline food as it is 100% alkaline and is very nutritious.

CROATIAN CENTER of RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES
special thanks to
Hakim Hauston from Indonesia
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