Tag Archives: http://ccres-aquaponics.blogspot.com

CCRES ALGAE

CCRES ALGAE

 We are committed to overcoming the world’s impending economic and environmental constraints with technology that produces sustainable, affordable, and local bio-based products from algae.

Algae hold great promise in the near term to fundamentally change America’s energy portfolio, sequester or convert atmospheric CO2 into market-ready products, and help grow our economy through the creation of tens of thousands of well-paying green-collar jobs. Algae-based jobs include:

Based on a survey conducted by the Algal Biomass Organization in January of 2010 with 52 reporting companies, a likely estimation of job growth is shown in the chart below as Scenario 1. In addition, based on the same survey, with the addition of regulatory and legislative parity in the US, accelerated job growth could occur as estimated Scenario 2.

Algae-based products and processes:

  • Can replace a significant percentage of America’s petroleum-based liquid transportation fuel, including jet fuel, gasoline and diesel, using photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic processes;
  • Are domestically produced and renewable;
  • Consume enormous amounts of CO2, and biologically sequester or beneficially reuse/convert atmospheric and industrial CO2into marketable products;
  • Can be grown in non-potable water, on non-agricultural land (thereby avoiding indirect land use issues).
  • Will be commercially produced in the near-term; low-carbon, drop-in transportation fuels will be produced by CCRES members within two years.
  • Can provide value-added co-products, including nutraceuticals, animal feed, cosmetics, plastics and other bio-based products, while also creating renewable, sustainable fuels.

World Ticker

World Population Estimate
7,003,790,794
03/30/2012 12:40 UTC

25% of fish are overexploited.
50% fully exploited.
37,701,652,877,614,190
Cubic feet since 1750 AD

2007? 2025? Never?
Many experts say it’s here.
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CO2 Generator

 

This is how to make a homemade carbon dioxide generator for your aquarium plants or algae.

yeast

sugar

tubule

 bottle 2 lit

add sugar 50 g

 add yeast 20 g

pierce stopper

half a liter of hot water

distilled water with the pores of Spirulina

the pipe going into the water

 CO2 begin to sink into the water after 10 minutes

after a few weeks you have

 SPIRULINA

CCRES SPIRULINA 

project of

Croatian Center of Renewable Energy Sources (CCRES)

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Answer to Fuel & Food Crises

Aaron Baum at work. All photos courtesy of The Algae Labby Alice C. Chen 

Microscopic spinning orbs and spirals of green goo are the answers to our planet’s energy crisis and arable land shortage. At least that’s what Aaron Baum, a 40-year-old Harvard graduate and Stanford PhD, has concluded.
And Baum should know. After a mid-life crisis of sorts, he spent months researching the types of science that would most benefit the world and concluded that algae are it. Now, he wants to share his passion with the public by creating communities of people with their own algae farms. Imagine that – you can have a personal algae tank that provides fresh, ultra-nutritious food on a year-round basis.
Baum is a research consultant for NASA’s OMEGA project, whose mission is to create massive amounts of algae for biofuel, fertilizer and food. The San Rafael, California algae-phile knows not everyone has access to professional grade equipment – which can cost tens of thousands of dollars – so Baum has started teaching seminars on how to raise spirulina inexpensively and in one’s own home. The day-long workshops cost $150 and he’ll also provide you with a kit that includes a tank, spirulina starter stock, a nutrient mix and other equipment for $200. Through these workshops, Baum hopes to continue forming a collaborative community that shares knowledge about algae farming.

The seminars grew out of Baum’s first venture in algae. In 2008, he created what he says was the world’s first communal algae farm. The project was based in Berkeley and consisted of more than a dozen 55-gallon tanks of algae. It eventually got so massive that it would’ve required full-time staff, so Baum closed it down when he traveled around the world last year to attend algae workshops and visit algae farms. When he returned, he thought it would be more manageable to have the farms in people’s homes. I talked with him about his adventures in algae, and his plans for the future
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Alice Chen: How did you get interested in algae?
Aaron Baum: As a scientist, I’m completely committed to doing good things for the environment. I earned my Phd in applied physics from Stanford in 1997 and worked for several years in Silicon Valley as a program manager on technologies I developed in graduate school. I realized I was working my butt off to make computer chips run faster. I kind of lost faith in what I was doing.
I dropped out of that field, worked as an artist for several years and realized I miss science — the intellectual challenge and making contributions and changing peoples’ lives. I decided to get back into science on my own terms.
I thought about it for a long time and decided I wanted to work in a field where I could be sure I was doing something good for the world. I started doing a lot of research four years ago and after a few months, algae started to stick up out above everything else. Back then if you searched for algae, what came up was how to kill algae and how bad it was because of algae blooms. That was happening for a while but now it’s exponentially worse. I started working in that area. Now if you search for algae (online), about half of what you find is good.
AC: What’s so great about algae?
AB: Algae is a way to grow really high quality food in a small area, on the surface of a body of water or in wastewater. Or you can grow algae in dilute urine which is an easy way to get the right nutrients and reduce your impact on the environment.
Most marine biologists consider that the number one danger to marine life is eutrophication, an excess of nutrients in the water from agricultural runoff due to application fertilizer. When it hits the ocean or lake, there are massive algae blooms. When they decay, they wipe out oxygen and everything dies.
If you can find a way to keep nutrients out of water, you reduce the size of dead zones. You can create controlled algae blooms, harvest algae and eliminate nutrients that way. Or you can take wastewater, give it to algae directly and absorb nutrients. You come out with clean water, fuel, food, fertilizer and extra oxygen. And on a small scale in your own house if you grow it in dilute urine, you reduce the fertilizer load on the local ecosystem.
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AC: Tell me about algae as food. Why are people so into it?
AB: The idea was first proposed in the 1930s in Germany. They were trying to develop it for growing food. You can grow a lot of food in a small area. It’s extremely nutritious on a gram-for-gram basis. You can mix it in with other food. It didn’t take off until spirulina in the 1970s. Now there’s chlorella.
Normally you get spirulina in a powder or pill form. It’s grown in large outdoor ponds normally, and you sieve it out of water. It’s kind of special. It grows in corkscrew filaments making it relatively easy to strain out of water using a special fabric. Most other kinds of algae are too small and roundish, very difficult to filter.
Algae as a food is extremely healthy. It’s high in complete protein, antioxidants, omega-3 fatty acids, and it’s effective against infections. It has defenses against viruses and you can acquire defenses as well. It’s good to protect against environmental toxins. There were dozens of experiments where they fed rats a regular diet and another group with spirulina. They exposed them to mercury, lead, pesticides, radiation and mutagens and found that spirulina-eating rats do much better.
In powder form, spirulina’s great, but when you want to eat a blueberry, you don’t want it powdered. You want it fresh. You can eat fresh spirulina that’s basically alive. It tastes better.
AC: What does it taste like?
AB: The problem with most algae is it tastes like seaweed. A lot of people are not turned on by that taste. I think it’s really good in certain dishes. When you eat it live, fresh, the taste is much lighter, creamy, and buttery. You can spread it on crackers. We mix it with brown rice and guacamole so it’s vegan. The easiest way is in carrot juice.
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AC: Is anyone else doing what you’re doing?
AB: We’re at the very beginning of growing it. A few people have worked on it. Some people in France grow spirulina on a small scale in their house. Outside of France, there’s been very little work. I’m not aware of anyone in the U.S. working on it other than us.
AC: Why haven’t more people already started growing algae in their homes?
AB: There are technical barriers. You need to grow live spirulina. You need a seed reactor, a nutrient mix to put in the water and a special cloth. You must maintain proper balance between acidity and alkalinity, and the proper temperature. What I’m doing is putting together a kit to provide live spirulina.
AC: How is this a communal project?
AB: I’m starting out by building the community and showing people how they can do it themselves. We’ll do it together and share information through our website.
Previously we built a whole algae lab all based on volunteer labor. We built it for about 1,000 times less money than what we spend in places like NASA. What we’re aiming to do is cultivate algae based on free material. We grow algae and are investigating it as fertilizer, biofuel, and growing it in dilute urine.
We’d like to create an international network of people growing all kinds of algae in their homes in a small community scale, sharing information, doing it all in an open source way. We’d be like the linux of algae – do-it-yourself with low-cost materials and shared information.
I get emails from all over world. There’s been a huge wave of interest in algae, driven by biofuels and by the growing awareness of the lack of farmland. If you want to make new farmland, you have to destroy ecosystems. The biggest impact humans have on the world is through agriculture. If we want to grow more food so people can eat better, we either destroy the last remaining ecosystems on the planet or find a new way to do things.

AC: What’s the market like for spirulina?
AB: The world consumes about 100,000 tons of spirulina a year. It’s used for animal feed and it’s a nutraceutical (that is, a food that provides health benefits). It’s kind of expensive, usually about $80 per pound for powder. It’s a very nutrient dense food. When I eat spirulina – I eat vegan – I don’t have cravings for meat or sugar. Food is more satisfying when it has spirulina. I eat a lot, 15 grams a day. Most people would consider 5 grams a day to be fairly high. If you’re eating 10 grams a day, you’re spending about $200 a year on it.
AC: How did you transition into algae as a career?
AB: I got interested in algae and decided to create an algae farm project at Burning Man in 2007. I got together a community of people and we created an installation on a trailer. We had 16 bioreactors with live algae that was eating the exhaust of a generator. They grew great – it was very successful. We had a lot of educational material. There were big posters jammed full of text explaining what we were doing and why it was interesting.
I’ve worked at the Exploratorium. They’ll tell you that anything beyond one to two sentences, there’s no way you’re going to get anyone in the public to read anything more than that. On the night of the Burn, the craziest night of all with partying and dancing, I went to the installation. We had forgotten to turn the lights on. In the dark, I was surrounded by people all using headlamps, leaning close and reading every single word we’d written. As soon as they knew I was part of it, they started peppering me with questions. A guy from NASA was inspired by this project and then joined the OMEGA project. And then he gave me a call.
LabBench

AC: What are you doing for NASA?
AB: We’re developing large-scale systems that are combining biofuel and fertilizer production with wastewater treatment and production of fresh air and fresh water. We’re using large membrane enclosures floating in bodies of water. It’s a low-energy, low-resource way of growing algae.
One budding thing of NASA technology – we’re working on a clever way of removing algae from water.
We’re focused on the biofuel aspect at NASA. For biofuel, you want a species that produces a lot of oil. Many species of algae can produce huge amounts of oil — they can be more than 50 percent oil by weight, compared to normal plants that only produce a few percent.
Algae can produce about 100 times more than typical oil plants like soybeans, on a per acre basis. You can grow enough algae to replace all of the fossil fuel in an area that’s small enough to be manageable. You don’t need to use farmland, there’s not much remaining in the world ready to be used, and you don’t need fresh water. The nice thing about algae is while they cleans water and air, they can produce very valuable things like fuel, fertilizer and food. They’re precursers for bioplastics, cosmetics and medicines.
It’s a new kind of farming, potentially very low impact and sustainable.
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AC: So what’s your vision — to see every household have algae?
AB: I don’t see why not. It should be easier than a vegetable plot. Algae is such a super food. It’s so productive on a daily basis that with one tank in a window you can significantly supplement the diet of one person. If you use a whole window, you could probably do two to three tanks year round and have even more. Every day you could be eating algae.
Algae is an incredible resource we haven’t tapped into. Human beings haven’t gone there yet because it’s microscopic. I didn’t know what algae were until quite a bit later in life. They don’t really teach you about it in school. It produces approximately 70 percent of the oxygen we breathe. It’s the basis of 95 percent of life that’s in oceans.
Even people with no dirt can grow fresh food for themselves. If you’re in an apartment complex on the 25th floor, you can still grow fresh food.

Croatian Center of Renewable Energy Sources
 special thanks to 
Alice C. Chen 
 

Alice C. Chen developed her storytelling skills while exploring the Amazon Rainforest as an undergraduate at Stanford University. She went on to earn her master’s degree from Northwestern University’s Medill and is now an award-winning journalist.
Alice has nearly a decade of experience across media and has produced stories for the web, print, TV and radio. Her pieces have appeared everywhere from the San Francisco Chronicle to BNET and Newsweek.com. Alice’s specialties include business and health care reporting, and she’s also interested in narrative writing, profiles and inspirational stories.
Previous to Alice’s freelancing career, she was an education reporter at the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, one of the largest daily newspapers in the country. Alice resides in the San Francisco Bay Area.

More info about AlgaeLab on
CCRES SPIRULINA 
project of 
Croatian Center of Renewable Energy Sources
(CCRES)
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Algae Competition: The Future of Algae

A Global Challenge to Design Visionary Algae Food and Energy Systems

Landscape Designs • Production Systems • Food Development

“How will growing algae change the world and improve our lives?”

Participants represent projects in 40 countries and have submitted amazing entries. Visit the exhibits.

The Future of Algae video introduces twenty visionary entries in the Competition. Beginning with algae pond systems and photobioreactors today, this video looks into our future, exploring emerging themes, schemes and dreams in algae architecture and landscape design.

More info at:  http://www.algaecompetition.com/

Croatian Center of Renewable Energy Sources special thanks to  Robert Henrikson and Mark Edwards
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CCRES promotes Elken Spirulina

Best Food for The Future – Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)
Spirulina contains nutrition not found in other food sources and is able to fulfill nutrition deficiency as well as neutralize our body’s acidic condition. Spirulina has been consumed by the Japanese for decades and has been proven to increase health and promote longevity.

To maintain healthy body, we need nutritious food which consists of 80% alkaline food, and 20% acidic food. Alkaline food presents only in vegetables, fruits, cheese, egg white and algae. Others are all acidic in nature. To make matter worse, modern food tends to be high in carbohydrates, calorie, glucose, fat and cholesterol, and at the same time, low in vitamin, minerals and proteins which are what our cells need the most. These conditions create nutrition-deficiency and acidic body condition.

Our body cells require 46 different types of nutrition in well balanced amount. These vitamins and minerals cannot be produced by our body and is used up daily. Therefore, we need to have them in our diets. Since the various types of nutrition may have dependencies among themselves, a lack in one element might cause another to be wasted.
Unbalanced nutrition may cause semi-healthy states, such as fatigue, susceptible to illness, lack of concentration, allergic, gastric and others.

Nutrisi tidak seimbang dan kondisi tubuh yang asam dapat mengakibatkan keadaan tubuh setengah sehat

Spirulina contains complete and balanced set of nutrition that is easily available to our cells for faster absorption and to strengthen our body’s immune system.

How to preserve health? Our body needs food in the following proportion to remain healthy: 80% alkaline food and 20% acidic food. Modern lifestyles and diets consist of mostly acidic food such as meat, seafood, grains and others. The choice of alkaline food is very limited and consist only of vegetables, fruits, algae, cheese and egg white. Spirulina is the best out of alkaline food as it is 100% alkaline and is very nutritious.

CROATIAN CENTER of RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES
special thanks to
Hakim Hauston from Indonesia
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CCRES AQUAPONICS Education Program

  Become an Activist! 

 The aquaponics courses held at the training center will teach students all of the basic skills and knowledge necessary to successfully breed and grow Koi or Tilapia and culture plants and vegetables “aquaponically” on a practical, self sustaining, “back yard” scale, as well as larger commercial scale.

 The courses include topics in Koi or Tilapia and aquaponic plant culture, breeding setups, equipment, reproduction, growth procedures, purging or cleaning, and harvesting of the fish and vegetables.
 The entire system consumes less than 400 watts.

The vegetable production is over twice what can be grown in the same square footage of soil. Fish are also harvested and excess vegetation is either fed to the fish or composted to build healthy soils.

 It is our desire to use such systems to replenish depleated or erroded soils in places that can no longer support farming and reclaim the losses of bad management.

 There is no soil in the system itself with only gravel as the growth media with nutrients provided by the fish.

Join the movement!  
Add your voice to our rapidly expanding network of grassroots activists.

Every day, CCRES supporters fight to make environmental education, clean energy solutions, and the green economy a reality.

  Volunteers have been the key to the success of the CCRES for the past years and we hope YOU will help make the 2012 CCRES even better!!

CCRES AQUAPONICS 
part of  NGO
CROATIAN CENTER of RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES (CCRES)
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Why choose Spirulina?

What is Spirulina?

 

 

Spirulina is 100% natural and a highly nutritious micro salt water plant. It was discovered in South American and Africa in natural alkaline lakes. This spiral shaped algae is a rich food source. For a long time (centuries) this algae has constituted a significant part of the diet of many communities. Since the 1970’s, Spirulina has been well known and widely used as a dietary supplement in some countries.

Spirulina contains rich vegetable protein (60~ 63 %, 3~4 times higher than fish or beef ), multi Vitamins (Vitamin B 12 is 3~4 times higher than animal liver), which is particularly lacking in a vegetarian diet. It contains a wide range of minerals (including Iron, Potassium, Magnesium Sodium, Phosphorus, Calcium etc.), a high volume of Beta- carotene which protects cells (5 time more than carrots, 40 time more than spinach), high volumes of gamma-Linolein acid (which can reduce cholesterol and prevent heart disease). Further, Spirulina contains Phycocyanin which can only be found in Spirulina.

In USA, NASA have chosen to use it for astronauts food in space, and even plan to grow and harvest it in space stations in the near future.

How does Spirulina grow?

There are four major conditions for growing Spirulina.

  1. Tropical weather
  2. Strong sunshine
  3. Pure water resource
  4. Pollution free environment

It is not possible to grow Commercial Spirulina culture in a cold or temperate area. Spirulina needs consistent high temperature which helps it’s growth. Spirulina will not grow anywhere that has constant low temperature (under 25 degrees). Under 20c degrees Spirulina will stop reproducing and die in a short time.

Spirulina absorbs sunshine and then creates a reaction in it’s cells. When this reaction starts, Spirulina will produce the nutrients in the cell and will convert carbon dioxide into oxygen. Strong sunshine helps Spirulina produce more nutrients.

Spirulina grows in alkaline saline water. Because Spirulina easily absorbs nutrients from water, if the water contains pollution or heavy metals, these will be highly concentrated in the Spirulina cell. If this happens, then this kind of Spirulina is no longer suitable for human consumption.

What does Spirulina contain?

With over 100 nutrients, Spirulina is often described as the most complete food source in the world. The American National Aeronautical and Space Agency includes it in their astronauts diet and plans to grow Spirulina in it’s space station. It’s easy to see why.

Japan has some good examples of some Japanese seniors who have only relied on Spirulina and water for more than 20 years showing how good is Spirulina for the human body.

How should Spirulina be stored?

High temperature, moisture or pollution will reduce the beneficial effects of Spirulina.

  1. Buy and keep no more than 6 months worth.
  2. After open the packaging we strongly recommend you use the product within three months.
  3. After usage , ensure you reseal the packing as soon as possible.
  4. Keep the product away from any possible heat source.
  5. Keep the product away from sun or any exposure to strong light.

Who should take Spirulina?

  1. Children who don’t like or get enough vegetables and or have an imbalanced food intake.
  2. Teenagers during their rapid growing period need a sufficient injection of nutrients. Spirulina is ideal for this.
  3. Pregnant mums who need extra nutrients.
  4. Seniors who have difficulty in having reasonable average 3 meals per day.
  5. Sport lovers or athletics who need extra nutrients to keep their energy levels up.
  6. Modern busy people who don’t have the time to eat good meals.
  7. Patients or people who need high volumes of nutrients to assist recovery (please consult your doctor)
  8. Vegetarians who require extra nutrient sources

Who shouldn’t take too much Spirulina?

  1. People with hyperparathyroidism
  2. People who have serious allergies to seafood or seaweed.
  3. Patients current experiencing high fever.

How much Spirulina should be taken?

We suggest 5~10 tablets a day for adults, 3~5 tablets for children under 12 years old. If you have special requirements for extra nutrients, please consult your chemist or your health practitioner.

How should Spirulina be taken?

  1. Take only with cold or warm water, (not juice, soft drinks, coffee or tea)
  2. After taking Spirulina, avoid alcohol, soft drinks or coffee for 30 minutes as these drinks can destroy some of the Spirulina nutrients and enzymes
  3. Take at least an extra half litre of water a day
  4. It doesn’t matter if you take it once a day or twice a day, so long as you take enough for a day.

What are the Spirulina side effects?

Spirulina is a totally natural product and will not normally cause any problems to the body. Even if too much is taken, there will be no harm to the body, but doing this is a waste.

However some people may experience some of the following symptoms after taking Spirulina;

  1. Slight fever due to the body’s need to burn the extra protein from Spirulina
  2. Slight dizziness. If this occurs, take less of the product. If the symptom does not improve please stop taking Spirulina
  3. Thirst and constipation. After taking a high volume of Spirulina we recommend at least an extra 1/2 litre of water per day to help our body absorb the Spirulina
  4. Stomach ache
  5. Skin itch or slight body rash

Spirulina: a food ? or a medicine?

As we all know, some of our illnesses are caused by having insufficient nutrients in our body. These illnesses are just the symptoms to show us that we may be lacking in some nutrients. If we replenish these nutrients in time, the symptoms usually disappear. If not, we can lower the function of our immune system causing further problems.

In most cases people will go to consult their doctor and may be prescribed some medicine.

Spirulina is not a medicine, but when used as a good source of supplementary food, you can avoid nutrient deficiencies causing illnessIn most cases people will go to consult their doctor and may be prescribed some medicine.

The topic of Spirulina is currently quite hot for it’s therapeutic applications. Medical research has already shown that Spirulina can provide benefits to our body.

Spirulina can help you to have reasonable levels of nutrients in your body, which will in turn give you less of the chance to get sick.

Spirulina Vegetable protein vs animal protein

Spirulina contains more than 60% vegetable protein, which is much higher than fish, pork, or beef (which contains about 15 ~20 %).Animal protein is a much bigger molecule than vegetable protein, and is much harder to for our system to digest.

Most modern people overindulge in animal protein, by eating fish, beef, pork etc. When too much animal protein is eaten, it is deposited in our body as fat. Too much fat will cause high cholesterol levels and may impact our heart and blood vessels.

Vegetable protein is water soluble, and is much smaller than animal protein. If you eat too much vegetable protein, it is simply discharged by your system as waste and not stored as fat.

Animal protein is a much bigger molecule than vegetable protein, and is much harder to for our system to digest.

Most modern people overindulge in animal protein, by eating fish, beef, pork etc. When too much animal protein is eaten, it is deposited in our body as fat. Too much fat will cause high cholesterol levels and may impact our heart and blood vessels.

Vegetable protein is water soluble, and is much smaller than animal protein. If you eat too much vegetable protein, it is simply discharged by your system as waste and not stored as fat.

Spirulina & Heavy metals contains

Spirulina easily absorbs the nutrients from any possible source. Like putting a dry sponge in water, Spirulina will take just about everything from the water and store it in their cells.

So ,take Spirulina from polluted area may result some negative result as Spirulina has been highly concentrate all the heavy metals from growing enviorment.

Pollution sources are;

  1. Air
  2. Water
  3. Dirt or dust
  4. Feed

Air pollution will bring lead, mercury etc. All commercial Spirulina is grown in open areas,for maximum production yield.

Water pollution is another issue. Most Spirulina production sites need plenty of water to compensate for high evaporation. If the water contains any heavy metal which will accumulate in the growing system, then Spirulina will absorb it. Water pollution is a big issue as even the water pumped from the sea or surface can contain certain amounts of possible pollutants which will eventually accumulate in Spirulina.

 

Why choose Spirulina?

Richest nutrient source

Spirulina is the richest nutrient and complete food source found in the world. It contains over 100 nutrients, more than any other plant, grain or herb. Today Spirulina is widely used as a food supplement to maintain health, boost energy and reduce weight

Spirulina contains 60-63 % protein, up to 13 % of essence minerals like Calcium, Magnesium, Potassium, Phosphorus, Iron, and Zinc as well as complete vitamin B groups and many important anti-oxidants (which protect cells). The anti-oxidant Phycocyanin can only be found in Spirulina. It is the richest natural source of Vitamin E and beta-carotene.

Energy booster

 

 

Spirulina being naturally green is beneficial to our health as it contains a large amount of the chlorophyll and Phycocyanin. Chlorophyll absorbs the energy from sunlight to create carbohydrates to boost your energy through the day.

 

Vegetarians best nutrient supplement

Vegetarians can not eat animal products and commonly lack Vitamin 12 (from the animal liver), Iron (from red meat or spinach) and Amino Acids. Spirulina is a natural organic product and vegetarians taking Spirulina daily will fill these gaps.

Concentrated of protein and essential fatty acid

Amino Acids are important to our body. They assist muscle growth, immunity, and the production of enzymes and hormones. Spirulina can provide more than 60~63 percent of protein including a complete source of 8 essential amino acids, plus 10 other non-essential amino acids, which are commonly lacking in vegetarian diets.

Spirulina is also one of the few sources of food that contains omega 3 and 6 fatty acids in the linolenin, gamma linolenin acid(GLA). These fatty acids are essential in keeping a woman’s body healthy.

Weight reduction

Although Spirulina can not directly reduce your weight, it contains the nutrients our bodies need and is quickly assimilated.

Adjust your body’s PH value

The ideal healthy human body’s PH level should remain on low alkaline about PH 7.35~7.45. Modern day people indulge in too much acidic food like soft drinks, meat, cheese, eggs, and ham. These cause our body to become acidic ( PH< 7 ). Many medical research reports have proven that acidic bodies will have more chance of getting diseases or cancer. Regular use of Spirulina can help keep your body alkaline will help you reduce this risk and is the ideal food supplement for the weight reducer.

Ideal supplement food for the pregnant women and infant

While women are pregnant, the baby in their body will rapidly absorb nutrients. If the pregnant mum does not get sufficient nutrients from food while her baby is growing, she will become depleted of these nutrients herself.

Spirulina easily provides the richest and most complete source of nutrients for the pregnant women and thereby prevents nutrient deficiency after the baby is born.

Natural Nutrient source

Most multi vitamin products are synthetic (artificial). No other products can provide natural nutrients and vitamins like Spirulina. Spirulina is a totally natural non synthetic product.

 

 

Nutrition Information

Vitamins

Vitamins are essential foods which the body needs in small amounts, to work normally and to stay healthy. They are essential for proper growth in children, and for the preservation of good health for all.

Vitamins are commonly classified under thirteen headings, using letters of the alphabet,and are considered according to their ability to be absorbed in fat or water. The vitamins which are soluble in fat are A, D, E and K, they are usually consumed with fat containing foods and the body can store them within its own fat. For this reason, they are retained over some period of time, so it is not necessary to eat or drink them each day. Water soluble vitamins are the B group and vitamin C. These cannot be retained in the body so we need to take foods which contain them every day.

Vitamins Supplied by Spirulina

B6 or pyridoxine helps in the breakdown and assimilation of proteins. It offers protection to the heart and reduces oedema.

Biotin is an enzyme that carries carbon dioxide and acts as an agent in the assimilation of some B complex vitamins.

B12 or Cobalamin is very difficult to extract from vegetables, but Spirulina is rich in this rare vitamin. The deficiency of B12 is indicated in cases of pernicious anaemia, nerve degeneration etc.

Pantothenic Acid is used in the adrenal glands along with vitamin C and cholesterol to produce steroids such as cortisone in response to physical and mental stress.

Folic Acid is essential for making new red blood cells.

Inositol keeps the liver healthy and balances blood holesterol. It is probably the most abundant vitamin in the body after niacin.

Niacin is considered to be a cholesterol lowering agent as well as being essential to mental health.

B2 or Riboflavin prevents eye problems and severe eczema.

B1 or Thiamine maintains glucose level in the blood. A serious deficiency of this vitamin may result in death.

E or Tocopherol. Preserves heart and vascular health and retards ageing.

Carotenoids. Some substances in plants are not always true vitamins, but they may be something from which the body can produce its own vitamins. The carotenoid compound of Spirulina is just such a substance. Carotenoids act as free radical quenchers, so they behave as a protector for the body’s own cells.

Normally, vitamin A is available only from the liver of some animals. Since vitamin A from animals is fat soluble, the human body stores it with its own fat reserves and it is not naturally expelled when an excess is consumed. Hence, vitamin A poisoning can occur.

Beta-Carotene is a very important antioxidant. There are some sources which are artificial, and others which exist within some of our vegetable foods.

The latter group or natural beta-carotenes are much to be preferred since the body can absorb these much more quickly. Several studies have indicated that people whose diet contains a lot of beta-carotene tend to have a lower risk of developing cancer. Other developing cancer. Other advantages are that natural sources do not contain preservatives or colouring materials.

Many common foods are rich in beta-carotene and may be enjoyed for their flavour as well as their goodness. Kale and spinach with their dark green leaves, broccoli, pumpkin, carrots, squash, papayas and cantaloupes all supply this important substance.

Green and yellow vegetables in general should be embraced as important foods for good health. Spirulina of course is very rich in beta-carotene, and by using it regularly you’d ensure the body was not in need of this essential food.

Other Good Things!

Depending upon growing conditions, Spirulina will be from 65% to 71% protein. This protein content is said to be biologically complete. That means that all eight essential amino acids are present in their correct ratios. A lot of plants contain various ranges of protein, but with differing quantities of amino acids. Thus some degree of incompleteness will exist.

Here again Spirulina is different in that it contains a total of 18 amino acids in the exact proportion to mother’s breast milk.
It has these eight complete amino acids regarded as ideal for the human body.

Regrettably, the human body is unable to store amino acids, so when incomplete foods are taken, there is frequently an imbalance in the diet. Spirulina can come to the rescue with its full range of complete amino acids. These are as follows.

Isoleucine (4.13%). Needed for growth, intelligence development and nitrogen balance within the body. Also assists with synthesising other nonessential amino acids.

Leucine (5.8%). Helps to increase muscular energy levels and stimulate brain function.

Lysine (4.0%). used for forming blood antibodies, improves the circulatory system and promotes cell growth.

Methionine (2.17%). Vital for metabolising fats and lipids that maintain a healthy liver. Also helps calm the nerves.

Phenylalanine (3.95%). Used by the thyroid for the production of thyroxin which in turn governs metabolic rate.

Threonine (4.17%). Improves competence of the intestines and thus aids digestion.

Tryptophane (1.13%). Enhances the use of B group vitamins, improves nerve fibres. This in its turn contributes to emotional stability and calmness.

Valine (6.0%). Assists with the co-ordination of the muscular system as well as contributing to improved mental capacity.

Nonessential amino acids

Another group of amino acids are termed as nonessential, and there are twelve of these. Well Spirulina doesn’t have all of them, but does have ten; not bad eh? Nonessential means that if not present in normal foods, they can be synthesised; it does not mean that the body has no need of them. Again, the following list is that of the nonessential amino acids which Spirulina can provide.

Alanine (5.82%). Strengthens the walls of cells.

Arginine (5.98%). Important for the production of (male) seminal fluid which is about 80% arginine. Assists in keeping the blood clean.

Aspartic Acid (6.34%). Helps with the transformation of carbohydrates to energy.

Cystine (0.67%). Aids with pancreatic health and thus stabilises blood sugar etc. May help towards alleviating food allergies.

Glutamic Acid (8.94%). Along with glucose it fuels the brain cells. Can reduce the craving for alcohol and also stabilise mental health.

Glycine (3.5%). Promoter of energy.

Histidine (1.08%). Improves nerve relays, especially in the hearing organs. Has even been used as a remedy for deafness.

Proline (2.97%). A Precursor of Glutamic acid.

Serine (4.0%). Helps with the formation of the fatty sheath surrounding nerve fibres.

Tyrosine (4.6%). May slow the ageing of cells and suppresses hunger. Involved in the colouration of hair and skin, and indeed helps with sunburn protection.

Chlorophyll – The Green Gold

Spirulina is very high in chlorophyll. It has an average of three times the amount of the green gold of other highly developed green plants. The dark green colour of Spirulina omes from the large amount of plant blood or in other words, chlorophyll, which is only one molecule different from haemoglobin in human blood and with it, a very important substance in a healthy diet. Chlorophyll in plants is collected sunlight. This “light-energy”, as Dr. Fritz-Albert Popp, Germany, calls it, is an important key factor in the human metabolism and cell communication.

Already in 1915 Prof. Richard Willstätter was honoured for his research about chlorophyll with the Nobel Prize. He proved, that chlorophyll is able to produce living substances from dead matter with the help of the stored, converted sunlight.

Dr. Ingfried Hobert, Germany, Chairman of the International Federation to Research and Develop Traditional Healing Methods and author of the book “Das Algen Gesundheits Buch” (The Algae Health Book), highlights in his book the benefits of chlorophyll in maintaining good health. Chlorophyll is mentioned for the prevention and treatment of gastric and duodenal ulcers, acne, to strengthens the heart muscles, build up immunity and energy, as a possible anti-bactericide, only to mention a few.

Minerals

Along with vitamins, we are always told how important minerals are. Well, to most people minerals come from rocks to form stalactites, or simply make washing water harder to wash with! Minerals really are chemical elements which we know are very important for good health. They are used in extremely small amounts however.

Spirulina grows in shallow ponds which contain very high concentrations of minerals. These ponds are very alkaline and in fact almost no other plant life can survive in this type of environment. Spirulina has the ability to lock many minerals into amino acids. By doing this, when we consume Spirulina, we receive the minerals in a form which our body can readily make use of. This next list shows those minerals and trace elements which Spirulina can provide.

Calcium (1,315 mg/Kg). The most abundant mineral in the human body. Essential for strong bones and teeth. Calcium also contributes to nerve transmission ability and absorbs acids in the body.

Potassium (15,400 mg/Kg). Used for regulating electrolytes. A deficiency can lead to heart attack and muscular collapse.

Zinc (39 mg/Kg). Assists with mental health, skin tone, prostate function and the ability for wounds to heal quickly.

Magnesium (1,915 mg/Kg). Assists with the assimilation of vitamins B and C and also some proteins. A deficiency may lead to muscular and cardiac problems.

Manganese (25 mg/Kg). Activates enzymes together with zinc. Helps stabilise blood sugars.

Selenium (0.40 ppm). Improves cardiac efficiency, reduces some types of toxicity and may retard ageing processes.

Iron (580 mg/Kg). Used for making haemoglobin, the oxygen carrier in the blood.

Phosphorus (8,942 mg/Kg). Found in almost every cell of the human body, and together with calcium contributes to strong bones, and assists with digestion of carbohydrates.This information in article is repruduced with a permission.

 

Croatian Center of Renewable Energy Sources 

special thanks to

 Harald W. Tietze

 “Spirulina – Micro Food Macro blessing”

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Nutritional elements contained Spirulina

 

 

CCRES SPIRULINA PROJECT

Amino-acids composition of bulk spirulina powder

Essential
amino acids
per 100 grams
of bulk
spirulina powder
Isoleucine 3.17g
Leucine 5.02g
Lysine 2.70g
Methionine
+ Cystine
2.19g
Phenylalanine
+ Tyrosine
5.00g
Threonine 2.78g
Tryptophan 0.84g
Valine 3.48g
(Total amount
of essential
amino acids)
(25.18g)

MORE INFO HERE

Non-essential
amino acids
per 100 grams
of bulk
spirulina powder
Arginine 3.60g
Alanine 4.11g
Aspartic acid 5.47g
Glutamic acid 8.02g
Glycine 2.85g
Histidine 1.09g
Proline 2.04g
Serine 2.74g
(Total amount
of non-essential
amino acids)
(25.18g)

Pigment contents of bulk spirulina powder
(per 100 grams)

Components per 100 grams of bulk spirulina powder
Chlorophyll-a 1.29g
Total carotenes 157mg
Xanthophylls 81mg
Phycocyanin 7.56g
Major carotenoids β-carotene 201mg
Zeaxanthin 72mg
Lutein ND

Spirulina consists of the wide range of healthy/nutritional elements, more than 50 different kinds.

 β-carotene, Zeaxanthin, Chlorophyll, Phycocyanin, Polysaccharide

Amino acids

Valine, isoleucine, leucine, phenylalanine, methionine, lysine, tryptophan, threonine, cystine, tyrosine, histidine, arginine, alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glycine, proline and serine.

Vitamins

Beta-carotene, vitamin E, vitamin K1, vitamin K2, vitamin B1, vitamin B2, niacin, pantothenic acid, vitamin B6, biotin, folic acid, vitamin B12 and inositol.

Minerals

Zinc, iron, magnesium, potassium, sodium, phosphorus, calcium, sulfur, selenium, cobalt, cupper, chromium and manganese.

Other nutritional elements

Dietary fiber, polysaccharides, linoleic acid, gamma-linolenic acid, phycocyanin, zeaxanthin, chlorophyll a, nucleic acid and SOD.

 

Generally, some nutrients function better in concert with vitamins, minerals and amino acids.

 

CROATIAN CENTER of RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES

 special thanks to 

Mr. Atsushi Egashira

 President of DIC LIFETEC Co.,Ltd

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Growing Spirulina at Home

 

The popular image of algae farming is bubbling green columns and white-coated scientists, and seems out of reach for ordinary people. Is the experience of algae farming limited to professionals? A growing network of DIY algae farmers is proving that we can all participate, by creating successful algae ponds and growth tanks in our own homes.

These are not mere science projects. Because of the high rate of algae growth and their potential nutrient density, it is possible to produce enough in a single window to significantly supplement an ordinary person’s experimentalist’s diet.

 

Helping these folks is the mission of our lab and website, Algaelab.org. Although there are many kinds of algae, and we’re committed to helping people grow any strain they’re interested in, we believe that Spirulina is the best species for DIYers to start with, for three main reasons:

Spirulina in microscope

Spirulina in microscope

 

1. The unique health value of live, fresh Spirulina, even at small doses.

Just a few grams of Spirulina powder a day have been shown to have definite health benefits. Spirulina is by far the most-studied nutritional algae, both in terms of its benefits and lack of harm. It has been shown to make a difference in preventing and treating ailments from obesity to malnutrition, cancer to heart disease.

These studies are on powdered Spirulina. Though it hasn’t been studied, it seems obvious that the live, fresh stuff—which is only available if you grow it yourself—would be even healthier. Personally, I find that eating a few grams of Spirulina with every meal makes the meal more satisfying, smoothes out sugar highs and lows, and gives me extended endurance and stamina.

 

2. Spirulina is safe and easy to grow.

As innocent as it may seem, Spirulina is in fact an extremophile, capable of growing in extremely alkaline water inhospitable to almost every other organism. Most other algae grow in essentially pH-neutral water, which supports the growth of a vast range of algae—including types that produce toxins—as well as doing nothing to inhibit the growth of other potentially harmful organisms such as bacteria. In my biofuel-algae work, we’re constantly fending off invasive species. It’s not just an academic concern. Since it is generally hard to control the growth of possibly harmful stuff (and although it’s fun, we think you should look at your culture under the microscope every day), this aspect of Spirulina cultivation is pretty key to growing pure and safe cultures on a DIY basis. One of the best aspects of growing your own Spirulina is knowing that the product that you are growing is as pure and free of contamination as possible.

 

3. Ease of harvest, and no need for further processing.

Harvesting Spirulina with a cloth filter

Harvesting Spirulina with a cloth filter

Even when an algal culture looks nice and thick, it’s probably still about 99.9% water. Separating the desired .1% from all that water can be a real trick. As a general rule, algal cells are tiny, roughly spherical, and devilishly difficult to pull out of the water without some special (read: expensive) tech. This is where the corkscrew shape of Spirulina cells comes in; when a culture is poured through nothing more complex than a fine cloth, it filters out easily, leaving a thick paste, which can be consumed immediately. Contrast that with the need for cell rupturing, drying, and product extraction in typical algal production systems, and it’s easy to see why Spirulina is a good place to start.

So if you or someone you know wants to get involved, what is necessary? Nothing more than a sunny window, some sort of transparent container, and a kit of supplies like we sell at AlgaeLab.org. If you want to assemble your own kit, we can set you up with spirulina starter, growing tips, and any other equipment you might want. To get in touch with the growing community of algae home-grow enthusiasts, as well as get your questions answered, join or visit this public forum: http://www.algaelab.org/phorum/

…and have a look at the ever-expanding Home-Grown Spirulina FAQ @ http://www.algaelab.org/faq/. Let us know about your algae adventures!


“...eating a few grams of Spirulina with every meal makes the meal more satisfying, smoothes out sugar highs and lows, and gives me extended endurance and stamina.”

Some FAQs about growing algae at home:

How long does it take to grow from the kit with the 1 liter starter bottle, until I can start harvesting from my tank?

Grow-up proceeds in stages—see the instructions; you put half the contents of the bottle into one quarter of the tank (2.5 gallons for a 10-gallon tank) to start with, which results in a very thin culture at first, which will thicken over time. After a couple of weeks, the algae should be thick enough that you can double the culture volume, then after a week or so, double again, so that the tank is full. Once the tank is full, the algae are thick (3cm Secchi or less, see below), and the pH has been at least 10 for 24 hours, you should be able to harvest. This process can take from 3 to 6 weeks.

 

AlgaeLab DIY Spirulina Growth Kit

AlgaeLab DIY Spirulina Growth Kit

 

Can I harvest multiple times?

Once you have a thriving culture (which typically takes a few weeks), you can harvest from it regularly (how often depends mostly on how much light the algae get, the more the better); each time you harvest, you add a little Make-Up Mix to the culture to make up for the nutrients that are taken out in the harvested algae.

 

What kind of water should I use to make the growth medium?

We use tap water, filtered through activated carbon (such as a Brita) or through a ceramic filter (such as a Berkey). Algae are quite sensitive to chlorine (which is why it’s used in the first place!), so tap water is only usable if the chlorine has been removed—which can be done using products sold for fish aquariums. The afore-mentioned filters, and de-chlorination, leave minerals in the water, which is generally a good thing; if you want to use de-mineralized water such as distilled or reverse osmosis water, or if your water is particularly soft, you may get better growth if you add some combination of 0.1 g/L magnesium sulfate, 0.5 g/L potassium sulfate, and/or 0.1 g/L calcium chloride (or lime or plaster). That said, we have yet to hear of anyone having trouble growing in non- or de-chlorinated drinking water of any kind.

 

How much Spirulina will I be able to harvest from my tank, how often, and for how long?

If you follow the instructions and thus provide proper temperature, pH, and nutrients, yield will depend mostly on the hours of bright light the tank receives. This generally means sunlight. (See below for a discussion of artificial lighting.) 
In a south-facing window with plenty of direct sun exposure, you can get roughly a tablespoon of live Spirulina harvest from a typical 10-gallon tank every other day. Two or three such tanks (or bigger) can fit in a window for daily harvest.

For how long? If the proper amount of make-up mix is added back to the tank after every harvest, the nutrient balance can be maintained for a high level of growth for about four to six months, at which point the pH will have risen too high (11+) for good growth. At this point you simply mix up a new batch of medium, harvest all your Spirulina, and immediately put them in the new medium.  After a couple of weeks your culture should be full, dense, and ready for harvest again, ready to start the 4-6 month cycle. So, you need enough starter mix to renew your culture every 4-6 months, though it’s a good idea to keep some on hand in case anything else might go wrong with your medium (though this is unusual). There is no reason why you shouldn’t be able to keep going this way indefinitely. The formulae for the starter and make-up mix are in the instructions if you want to make your own.

 

How do I use the Make-Up Mix?

As described above, the make-up mix is used only at harvest time (or when removing dead algae). Add an amount of make-up mix proportional to the harvested algae—one teaspoon of the mix per tablespoon of harvested algae, plus a dash of iron juice. This makes up for the nutrients lost in the harvested algae, thus the name.

How do I keep my Spirulina alive when I go on vacation?  Can they be “parked” for a while?

The trick is to slow down their metabolism by lowering the tank temperature. This can be done simply by turning off the heater. The tank should also be kept from strong direct light during this time as well, although it does need some light. If kept in this way, it should be fine for several weeks or more. When bringing it back from this state, raise the temperature and light in stages, over a few days, and the algae will be fine.

 

Can I use artificial lights to grow my algae?

Some algae-nauts have had good results from using artificial illumination, but it’s worth remembering that direct sunshine is about 100x brighter (~100,000 lux) than the light in what would be considered a very well artifically-lit room (1000 lux). It’s hard to compete with the sun. If using artificial lighting, it’s smart to take advantage of the heat generated by the light fixture as well. See below for a discussion of the optimal color for an artificial light source.
Do I need to tell you to be very careful about combining water and electricity? Watch for dripping water going along power cords – keep plugs high so you won’t get shocked!

 

What are the health benefits of eating Spirulina?

Too many to mention here; take a look around the Web for a more complete picture. In a nutshell, because it lacks a cell wall or any other indigestible components, Spirulina is a super-concentrated, highly available nutrient source, which enhances the nutrition of any food eaten with it. Spirulina is about 65% complete protein, and the remainder is packed with anti-oxidants, essential omega-3 fatty acids, and other compounds with healthful anti-inflammatory, anti-viral, and anti-cancer properties. As a blue-green algae, its nutritional value is unique, since blue-green algae split evolutionarily from green plants approximately a billion years ago.

My experience with Spirulina (I eat about 15 grams a day) is that it greatly improves my stamina, raises and levels out my mood, and speeds up all kinds of healing. The first two effects are consistent with clinical studies that show a large reduction (up to 50%)in the glycemic index of foods eaten with even a small amount (2.5%) of Spirulina.

 

Is live Spirulina better for you than the powder or pills I can get at the health food store?

All studies of the health benefits of Spirulina have been on the dead, powdered stuff. It stands to reason, though, that the live, fresh version of such a highly perishable food would have superior properties, and this is my experience, having eaten both. Purveyors of the powder claim that they take every precaution to preserve the nutritional properties of the algae, but what would you rather eat, a fresh blueberry, or a powdered blueberry?

 

How long does the live, fresh Spirulina last? How can I preserve it?

Fresh Spirulina, once removed from the preserving alkaline environment of the tank, is like raw eggs in its perishability—it should be eaten or refrigerated within an hour or so of harvest. It will last in the fridge for up to three days. If frozen, it lasts indefinitely; if dehydrated (and kept dry), it will last for about a year, longer if kept in an airtight container. It’s not hard to tell if it does go bad—it smells like rotten eggs.

 

Is there an optimal artificial light to use for growing Spirulina?

As a general rule, a plant or alga (or anything else for that matter) absorbs the wavelengths (colors) that are not present in its apparent color, which is made up of the wavelengths that it bounces out without absorbing. So, the chlorophyll of green plants absorbs mainly red and blue light, and bounces out green light. Green plants need both red and blue light to thrive. Blue-green algae, such as spirulina, have special accessory pigments called phycocyanins and allophycocyanins, which allow them to capture more red and orange light (and to a lesser extent yellow and green) than green plants. They do have chlorophyll (only slightly different from green plants’ chlorophyll), so they also use blue light.

For these reasons, ordinary “grow lights”, which are optimized for green land plants, are not particularly good for growing Spirulina or other blue-green algae (though they will work). A light with more red and orange light—i.e. a “warmer” color—would be more efficient for growth, as a higher fraction of the light will be absorbed. Another approach would be to use white light supplemented by a red-orange light source (peaking at 620-650 nm), to hit the phyco-pigments better. I have used the “warmer” colored compact fluorescents with some success, but haven’t done any side-by-side testing. In general, though, the color of the light source is not as important in my experience as getting the nutrients and temperature right, and providing LOTS of light, which is a lot easier using sunshine!

 

CCRES AQUAPONICS special thanks to Dr. Aaron Baum, of AlgaeLab.org

 

CCRES AQUAPONICS 

Project of NGO

Croatian Center of Renewable Energy Sources (CCRES)

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